RESEARCH TOPICS

Multiscale and Multiphysics Modeling

 

Even with the computational power currently available, the adoption of nano/micro/meso-scale (discrete) approaches become computationally intractable in the case of fine grained materials, such as nano-composites, ceramics, rocks, metallic powders, etc., or in the case of large structures, such as tall buildings, dams, bridges, etc. For this reason there is clearly a need for effective multiscale techniques suitable for upscaling discrete systems. My research group is currently exploring, evaluating the effectiveness, and further extending a variety of multiscale techniques recently developed to bridge atomistic and continuum scales.

The Lattice Discrete Particle Model
Multiscale and Multiphysics Modeling

 

Even with the computational power currently available, the adoption of nano/micro/meso-scale (discrete) approaches become computationally intractable in the case of fine grained materials, such as nano-composites, ceramics, rocks, metallic powders, etc., or in the case of large structures, such as tall buildings, dams, bridges, etc. For this reason there is clearly a need for effective multiscale techniques suitable for upscaling discrete systems. My research group is currently exploring, evaluating the effectiveness, and further extending a variety of multiscale techniques recently developed to bridge atomistic and continuum scales.

Multiscale and Multiphysics Modeling

 

Even with the computational power currently available, the adoption of nano/micro/meso-scale (discrete) approaches become computationally intractable in the case of fine grained materials, such as nano-composites, ceramics, rocks, metallic powders, etc., or in the case of large structures, such as tall buildings, dams, bridges, etc. For this reason there is clearly a need for effective multiscale techniques suitable for upscaling discrete systems. My research group is currently exploring, evaluating the effectiveness, and further extending a variety of multiscale techniques recently developed to bridge atomistic and continuum scales.

3D Printing of Infrastructure Materials

3D printing aka additive manufacturing is becoming mainstream in many industries. Currently available technologies allow printing engine parts, electronic devices, medical prosthetics, and even clothing, food, and human organs. With 3D printing, the fundamental change in the production processes of objects is associated with a paradigm shift in the way these objects are conceived. 3D printing allows for the design and production of complex shapes that liberate the imaginations of designers, architects, and engineers, opening unexplored possibilities for performance optimization to achieve stronger, tougher, more durable, more esthetically appealing, and more environmentally friendly products, while possibly even reducing costs. One of the many benefits of 3D printing technologies is their versatility and the possibility to adapt the design of the final structure as well as the design if the 3D printing process to local situations and particular needs. In our group, we conduct research focused on 3D printing of infrastructure materials, including concrete, cementitious composites, and sulfur concrete. In addition, we are formulating and validating computational models that simulate the behavior of these materials during the printing process.

Concrete 3D Printing Simulations
Alkali Silica Reaction Simulation
Composite Materials

 

Development of energy efficient and environmentally friendly technologies is certainly at the forefront of Engineering of the twenty-first Century. Design of high-strength, light-weight, and corrosion-resistant materials is the key, for example, for the design of energy-saving transportation systems (cars, aircrafts, ships, etc.). We  work on the formulation of general triaxial constitutive laws for the simulation of anisotropic elasticity, damage, and failure of quasi-brittle composites, such as carbon-epoxy and glass-epoxy composites. The adopted model (called the Spectral Stiffness Microplane Model) is formulated in the context of the microplane theory and exploits the spectral decomposition of the stiffness matrix to identify orthogonal strain modes at the microplane level. Future extensions of this work will take into account the visco-elastic, rate- and temperature-dependent character of these materials in order to be able to simulate the behavior of mechanical components under high impulsive loading conditions and in extreme environments.

Spectral Microplane Theory
Wood Creep

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